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Tag Archives: university

Fossil Find Suggests Dinosaurs Crossed North America Before Extinction

Fossil Find Suggests Dinosaurs Crossed North America Before Extinction

Tooth of a horned dinosaur from Mississippi. | A single dinosaur tooth is helping paleontologists better understand what North America looked like right before non-avian dinosaurs went extinct. Prior to 68–66 million years ago, hefty horned dinosaurs migrated from western North America to the east. One such animal died sometime after the lengthy journey, perhaps falling victim to a bloodthirsty …

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Colliding Dead Stars May Explain the Milky Way’s Mysterious Antimatter

Colliding Dead Stars May Explain the Milky Way's Mysterious Antimatter

An artist’s impression of two white dwarf stars destined to merge and create a Type Ia supernova. | The majority of antimatter that pervades the Milky Way may come from clashing remnants of dead stars, a new study finds. The work may solve a 40-year-old astrophysics mystery, the study’s researchers said. For every particle of normal matter, there is an …

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Synthetically Produced Melanin Could Be the Ultimate Sunscreen

Synthetically Produced Melanin Could Be the Ultimate Sunscreen

The lab-produced material could have practical implications for the treatment of melanin-deficient disorders such as vitiligo and albinism. With summer quickly approaching, many of us are looking forward to beach vacations, picnics, and swimming at the local pool. But with increased sun exposure comes an increased risk of skin damage that sunscreen can’t always protect against. Last week, researchers at …

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Orphan Planet’s Huge Disk Shows That Planets Are More Like Stars Than We Know

Orphan Planet's Huge Disk Shows That Planets Are More Like Stars Than We Know

An artist’s impression of the gas and dust disk around the planet-like object OTS44. First radio observations indicate that OTS44 has formed in the same way as a young star. | The lonely life of OTS44, an orphan planet floating in space without a parent star, has taken a mysterious turn. New observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) …

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Himalayan powerhouses: how Sherpas have evolved superhuman energy efficiency

Himalayan powerhouses: how Sherpas have evolved superhuman energy efficiency

Sherpas have evolved to become superhuman mountain climbers, extremely efficient at producing the energy to power their bodies even when oxygen is scarce, suggests a new study led by University of Cambridge and UCL researchers, published today in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) . The findings could help scientists develop new ways of treating hypoxia – lack …

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When artificial intelligence botches your medical diagnosis, who’s to blame?

When artificial intelligence botches your medical diagnosis, who’s to blame?

Artificial intelligence is not just creeping into our personal lives and workplaces—it’s also beginning to appear in the doctor’s office. The prospect of being diagnosed by an AI might feel foreign and impersonal at first, but what if you were told that a robot physician was more likely to give you a correct diagnosis? Medical error is currently the third …

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The New Age of Analytics: Artificial Intelligence and Data are Not Enough to Power Your Business

The New Age of Analytics: Artificial Intelligence and Data are Not Enough to Power Your Business

In this special guest feature, Rosemary Radich, Head of Business Intelligence and Data Analytics for AccuWeather , discusses the importance of the weather data dimension as an adjunct to traditional data sources in capturing the broader picture impacting behavior and results from machine learning. In her critical role overseeing AccuWeather’s dedicated global weather data science and analytics team, Radich identifies …

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We’re not getting Luke Skywalker’s prosthetics any time soon

We're not getting Luke Skywalker's prosthetics any time soon

In 1937, robot hobbyist "Bill" Griffith P. Taylor of Toronto invented the world’s first industrial robot. It was a crude machine, dubbed the Robot Gargantua by its creator. The crane-like device was powered by a single electric motor and controlled via punched paper tape, which threw a series of switches controlling each of the machine’s five axes of movement. Still, …

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IoT takes control of colleges

IoT takes control of colleges

Vast network of devices can save energy and boost convenience, but security concerns persist Kelly Walsh is CIO of The College of Westchester in New York. The internet of things—known in acronym-speak as IoT—seems to be popping up everywhere. Everything is getting connected. Thermostats, fitness bands, voice-controlled assistants, remotely controlled webcams, smartphones, washing machines, autonomous vehicles—the list goes on and …

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With a tight federal budget, here’s where to focus clean energy research funding

With a tight federal budget, here’s where to focus clean energy research funding

Checking the power output of a photovoltaic concentrator array built by Martin Marietta, Inc., at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The U.S. Department of Energy spends US$3-$4 billion per year on applied energy research. These programs seek to provide clean and reliable energy and improve our energy security by driving innovation and helping companies bring new clean energy …

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